Short Name:
ERBE_S10N_WFV_SF_NAT

Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) S-10N (Nonscanner-only) Wide Field of View (WFOV) Shape Factor (SF) Earth Flux and Albedo

ERBE_S10N_WFV_SF_NAT_1 is the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) S-10N (Non-scanner-only) Wide Field of View (WFOV) Shape Factor (SF) Earth Flux and Albedo data product. Data collection for this product is complete. It is available in the Native (NAT) Format. ERBE was a multi-satellite system designed to measure the Earth's radiation budget. The ERBE instruments flew on a mid-inclination National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) and two sun-synchronous National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellites (NOAA-9 and NOAA-10). Each satellite carried both a scanner and a non-scanner instrument package. The non-scanner instrument package contained four Earth-viewing channels and a solar monitor. The Earth-viewing channels had two spatial resolutions: a horizon-to-horizon view of the Earth, and a field-of-view limited to about 1000 km in diameter. The former was called WFOV and the latter the medium field-of-view (MFOV) channels. The solar monitor was a direct descendant of the Solar Maximum Mission's Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor detector. Due to the concern for spectral flatness and high accuracy, all five of the channels were active cavity radiometers. The MFOV (medium-field-of-view) SF (shape factor) S-10 contained inverted daily, monthly hourly, and monthly averages of shortwave and long-wave radiant fluxes at the top-of-the-atmosphere for one month. This data set was produced for each of the satellites (ERBS and NOAA-9) and the combination of satellites, which were operational during the data month. The values for this data set were derived using the shape factor technique (Smith et al. 1986). As described in the Earth Radiant Fluxes and Albedo, Scanner S-9, Non-scanner S-10/S-10N User's Guide, the data contains a 30 byte header, 67 scale factors which were used to scale the data in the first record, and 26 scale factors which were used to scale the data in the second record. The data set also contained two records for each processed region. The first record was of fixed length (990 words) and contained averaged data. The second record was of variable length and contained individual hour box estimates. The length of the second record, in words, was calculated by multiplying the number of hour boxes (978th word of record one) by the number of values stored for each hour box (38 for the non-scanner).

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