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  • Case Studies of the Oregon Floods of February and November 1996

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C1214593841-SCIOPS.xml
    Description:

    The first case study is of the great flood of 1996 in western Oregon. This study is authored by George S. Taylor, State Climatologist for Oregon. A series of intense surges of subtropical moisture inundated western Oregon during the period February 5-9. The combination of record-breaking rain, warm temperatures, and a deep snowpack led to severe flooding throughout northern sections of the state. River flood stages were comparable in magnitude to the December, 1964 flood, the largest in Oregon since flood control reservoirs were built in the 1940's and 1950's On this World Wide Web page you will find a detailed discussion of this weather event. In addition there are several tables covering observed, normal, 4-day total, and record precipitation amounts for various Oregon observing sites. Flood summaries issued by the National Weather Service in Portland and US Army Corps of Engineers are available. GIF files of 24 hour precipitation from NEXRAD radar, infrared satellite images, 500 MB weather chart, and stream flow diagrams may all be downloaded from this site. The stream flow diagrams are for the Hood, McKenzie, and Nehalem rivers. Photographs of the flood ravaged region may be downloaded for viewing. This February 1996 case study is available on the Oregon Climate Service Home Page. Link to: "http://www.ocs.orst.edu/reports/flood96/flood96.html" ----------------------------------------------------------------- Record-breaking precipitation throughout much of Oregon caused local flooding, landslides, and power outages over much of the state during November 18-20. The rain resulted from a broad upper-air weather system of moist subtropical air which originated over the tropical Pacific. The air mass reached central California over the previous weekend, producing rainfall daily amounts as much as 8 inches. Gradually the system moved northward, reaching southwestern Oregon on the 17th and spreading to the remainder of the state the following day. High rainfall amounts were reported throughout the state. USGS hydrographs for several stations in Oregon may be downloaded from This World Wide Web site. In addition, local pictures of the flooding in Corvallis on November 20 and 21 1996 may be downloaded for viewing. This November 1996 case study is available on the Oregon Climate Service Home Page. Link to: "http://www.ocs.orst.edu/reports/flood1196/Nov96_flood.html"

    Links: Temporal Extent: Spatial Extent:
    Minimum Bounding Rectangle: 43 -125 47 -117

    SCIOPS Short Name: OREG_CLIM_FLOOD_96 Version ID: Not provided Unique ID: C1214593841-SCIOPS

  • CERES GEO Cloud Retrievals in ISCCP-D2like Format Daytime Edition3A

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C7019528-LARC_ASDC.xml
    Description:

    The Monthly Gridded Cloud Averages (ISCCP-D2like-GEO) data product contains monthly and monthly 3-hourly (GMT-based) gridded regional mean geostationary satellite (GEO) cloud properties as a function of 18 cloud types, similar to the ISCCP D2 product, where the cloud properties are stratified by pressure, optical depth, and phase. The ISCCP-D2like-GEO product is a 5-satellite, daytime 3-hourly GMT, 8-km nominal resolution, geostationary-only cloud product limited to to . The ISCCP-D2like-GEO is a daytime-only product, where the cloud retrievals incorporate only the visible and IR channels common to all geostationary satellites for spatial consistency. Each ISCCP-D2like file covers a single month.606011 Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) is a key component of the Earth Observing System (EOS) program. The CERES instruments provide radiometric measurements of the Earth's atmosphere from three broadband channels. The CERES missions are a follow-on to the successful Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) mission. The first CERES instrument (PFM) was launched on November 27, 1997 as part of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). Two CERES instruments (FM1 and FM2) were launched into polar orbit on board the EOS flagship Terra on December 18, 1999. Two additional CERES instruments (FM3 and FM4) were launched on board EOS Aqua on May 4, 2002. The newest CERES instrument (FM5) was launched on board the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) satellite on October 28, 2011.

    Links: Temporal Extent: Spatial Extent:
    Minimum Bounding Rectangle: -90 -180 90 180

    LARC_ASDC Short Name: CER_ISCCP-D2like-GEO_DAY Version ID: Edition3A Unique ID: C7019528-LARC_ASDC

  • CERES MODIS and GEO Cloud Retrievals in ISCCP-D2like Format Daytime Edition3A

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C7019527-LARC_ASDC.xml
    Description:

    The Monthly Gridded Cloud Averages (ISCCP-D2like-Mrg) data product contains monthly and monthly 3-hourly (GMT-based) gridded regional mean cloud properties as a function of 18 cloud types, similar to the ISCCP D2 product, where the cloud properties are stratified by pressure, optical depth, and phase. The Mrg product combines daytime cloud properties from Terra-MODIS (10:30 AM local equator crossing time LECT), Aqua-MODIS (1:30 PM LECT), and geostationary satellites (GEO) to provide the most diurnally complete daytime ISCCP-D2like product. The GEO cloud properties have been normalized with MODIS for diurnal consistency. The CERES MODIS-derived cloud properties are not the official NASA MODIS cloud retrievals, but are based on the CERES cloud working group retrievals that are also available in other CERES products. The CERES MODIS-derived cloud properties provide coverage from pole to pole. The 3-hourly GMT-based GEO cloud properties come from five satellites at 8km nominal resolution with coverage limited to to . The GEO daytime cloud retrievals incorporate only a visible and IR channel common to all geostationary satellites for spatial consistency. The geostationary calibration is normalized to Terra-MODIS. Each ISCCP-D2like file covers a single month. Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) is a key component of the Earth Observing System (EOS) program. The CERES instruments provide radiometric measurements of the Earth's atmosphere from three broadband channels. The CERES missions are a follow-on to the successful Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) mission. The first CERES instrument (PFM) was launched on November 27, 1997 as part of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). Two CERES instruments (FM1 and FM2) were launched into polar orbit on board the EOS flagship Terra on December 18, 1999. Two additional CERES instruments (FM3 and FM4) were launched on board EOS Aqua on May 4, 2002. The newest CERES instrument (FM5) was launched on board the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) satellite on October 28, 2011.

    Links: Temporal Extent: Spatial Extent:
    Minimum Bounding Rectangle: -90 -180 90 180

    LARC_ASDC Short Name: CER_ISCCP-D2like-Mrg_GEO-MODIS-DAY Version ID: Edition3A Unique ID: C7019527-LARC_ASDC

  • COMET Case Study 007: High Plains Snow Event 1996 Data at UCAR/JOSS/NOAA/CODIAC

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C1214584238-SCIOPS.xml
    Description:

    This case contains data from a high plains snow event on 13-14 March 1996 over Northern Colorado and Southern Wyoming. For more information, see: http://data.eol.ucar.edu/codiac/projs?COMET_CASE_007

    Links: Temporal Extent: Spatial Extent:
    Minimum Bounding Rectangle: 35 -110 45 -100

    SCIOPS Short Name: COMET007_UCAR_JOSS_NOAA_CODIAC Version ID: Not provided Unique ID: C1214584238-SCIOPS

  • COMET Case Study 008: California Flood 1996-1997 Data at UCAR/JOSS/NOAA/CODIAC

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C1214584292-SCIOPS.xml
    Description:

    This case focuses on the northern California Flood which occurred 31 December 1996 to 3 January 1997. It was a major hydrologic event with impressive rainfall with subsequent river flooding and levee breaches. For more information, see: http://data.eol.ucar.edu/codiac/projs?COMET_CASE_008

    Links: Temporal Extent: Spatial Extent:
    Minimum Bounding Rectangle: 19 -155 51 -100

    SCIOPS Short Name: COMET008_UCAR_JOSS_NOAA_CODIAC Version ID: Not provided Unique ID: C1214584292-SCIOPS

  • COMET Case Study 010: Southeastern U.S. Severe Weather 1997 Data at UCAR/JOSS/NOAA/CODIAC

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C1214584316-SCIOPS.xml
    Description:

    This case covers a wide range of convective weather extending from Texas and Oklahoma to Tennessee and Alabama, including the tornado that touched down in Jarrell, TX. For more information, see: http://data.eol.ucar.edu/codiac/projs?COMET_CASE_010

    Links: Temporal Extent: Spatial Extent:
    Minimum Bounding Rectangle: 25 -104.5 39 -83

    SCIOPS Short Name: COMET010_UCAR_JOSS_NOAA_CODIAC Version ID: Not provided Unique ID: C1214584316-SCIOPS

  • COMET Case Study 011: Fort Collins, Colorado Flash Flood Event Data at UCAR/JOSS/NOAA/CODIAC

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C1214584293-SCIOPS.xml
    Description:

    This case covers the Fort Collins, CO flash flood event which occurred 28-29 July 1997. Backbuilding echoes increased the duration of rainfall. This, in addition to very intense rainfall, combined with urban runoff complexities and resulted in an extreme hydrologic response. For more information, see: http://data.eol.ucar.edu/codiac/projs?COMET_CASE_011

    Links: Temporal Extent: Spatial Extent:
    Minimum Bounding Rectangle: 38 -108.4 41 -102

    SCIOPS Short Name: COMET011_UCAR_JOSS_NOAA_CODIAC Version ID: Not provided Unique ID: C1214584293-SCIOPS

  • COMET Case Study 013: Southern California Floods/Florida Tornadoes 1998 Data at UCAR/JOSS/NOAA/CODIAC

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C1214584317-SCIOPS.xml
    Description:

    A strong winter storm system moved over Southern California and brought heavy rain as tropical moisture fed into the system. At the same time, an intense storm system moved across Florida with tornadoes forming over the central part of the state. For more information, see: http://data.eol.ucar.edu/codiac/projs?COMET_CASE_013

    Links: Temporal Extent: Spatial Extent:
    Minimum Bounding Rectangle: 30 -127 42.5 -106

    SCIOPS Short Name: COMET013_UCAR_JOSS_NOAA_CODIAC Version ID: Not provided Unique ID: C1214584317-SCIOPS

  • COMET Case Study 014: Midwest Cold Season Synoptic Storm 1996 Data at UCAR/JOSS/NOAA/CODIAC

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C1214584295-SCIOPS.xml
    Description:

    This case covers a storm that is an example of "classical" cyclone development with some structure similar to the Norwegian conceptual model of storm development. For more information, see: http://data.eol.ucar.edu/codiac/projs?COMET_CASE_014

    Links: Temporal Extent: Spatial Extent:
    Minimum Bounding Rectangle: 27 -115 55 -70

    SCIOPS Short Name: COMET014_UCAR_JOSS_NOAA_CODIAC Version ID: Not provided Unique ID: C1214584295-SCIOPS

  • COMET Case Study 017: Desert Southwest U.S. 1997 Severe Weather Data at UCAR/JOSS/NOAA/CODIAC

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C1214584319-SCIOPS.xml
    Description:

    Case 017 is the latest in a series of convective cases from different regions of the United States.This case focuses on the unique aspects of convective storm initiation and subsequent evolution in the southwest monsoon environment. For more information, see: http://data.eol.ucar.edu/codiac/projs?COMET_CASE_017

    Links: Temporal Extent: Spatial Extent:
    Minimum Bounding Rectangle: 25.3 -137.6 49.5 -105.1

    SCIOPS Short Name: COMET017_UCAR_JOSS_NOAA_CODIAC Version ID: Not provided Unique ID: C1214584319-SCIOPS