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  • ABI/GOES-17 Dark Target Aerosol 10-Min L2 Full Disk 10 km

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C2859265967-LAADS.xml
    Description:

    The ABI/GOES-17 Dark Target Aerosol 10-Min L2 Full Disk 10 km product, short-name XAERDT_L2_ABI_G17 is provided at 10-km spatial resolution (at-nadir) and a 10-minute full-disk cadence that typically yields about 144 granules over the daylit hours of a 24-hour period. The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite – GOES-17 served in the operational GOES-West position (near -137°W), from February 12, 2019, through January 4, 2023. The GOES-16/ABI collection record spans from January 2019 through December 2022. The XAERDT_L2_ABI_G17 product is a part of the Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO)–Low-Earth Orbit (LEO) Dark Target Aerosol project under NASA’s Making Earth System Data Records for Use in Research Environments (MEaSUREs) program, led by Robert Levy, uses a special version of the MODIS Dark Target (DT) aerosol retrieval algorithm to produce Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) and other aerosol parameters derived independently from seven sensor/platform combinations, where 3 are in GEO and 4 are in LEO. The 3 GEO sensors include Advanced Baseline Imagers (ABI) on both GOES-16 (GOES-East) and GOES-17 (GOES-West), and Advanced Himawari Imager (AHI) on Himawari-8. The 4 LEO sensors include MODIS on both Terra and Aqua, and VIIRS on both Suomi-NPP and NOAA-20. Adding the LEO sensors reinforces a major goal of this project, which is to render a consistent science maturity level across DT aerosol products derived from both types and sources of orbital satellites. The XAERDT_L2_ABI_G17 product, in netCDF4 format, contains 45 Science Data Set (SDS) layers that include 8 geolocation and 37 geophysical SDSs. For more information consult LAADS product description page at: https://ladsweb.modaps.eosdis.nasa.gov/missions-and-measurements/products/XAERDT_L2_ABI_G17 Or, Dark Target aerosol team Page at: https://darktarget.gsfc.nasa.gov/

    Links: Temporal Extent: Spatial Extent:
    Minimum Bounding Rectangle: -90 -180 90 180

    LAADS Short Name: XAERDT_L2_ABI_G17 Version ID: 1 Unique ID: C2859265967-LAADS

  • Dynamics and Chemistry of the Summer Stratosphere Model Output

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C2276336408-LARC_ASDC.xml
    Description:

    DCOTSS-Model-Output features numerical model output for the Dynamics and Chemistry of the Summer Stratosphere sub-orbital campaign. Featured in this product are trajectory calculations, convection-permitting model simulations, and chemistry model output. Air parcel trajectories are computed using the TRAJ3D trajectory model. Two types of trajectory products are created: flight trajectories and overshoot trajectories. Flight trajectories will be initialized every second along each Dynamics and Chemistry of the Summer Stratosphere (DCOTSS) flight track and run backwards for up to 10 days. Overshoot trajectories will be initialized in overshoot volumes identified from both GridRad radar and GOES satellite data every 10 minutes and run forward for up to 5 days. Convection allowing model simulations are carried out using the Weather Research and Forecasting Model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem). These will aid in the evaluation of aircraft observations and evaluate the ability of numerical models to represent overshooting convection and transport. Photodissociation frequencies (J values) will also be computed using a radiative transfer model of the UV and Visible (UV/Vis) spectral regions. Data collection for this product is ongoing and currently only features the first deployment. Each summer the North American Monsoon Anticyclone (NAMA) dominates the circulation of the North-Western Hemisphere and acts to partially confine and isolate air from the surrounding atmosphere. Strong convective storms in the NAMA regularly reach altitudes deep into the lower stratosphere, with some ascending above 20 km. These storms carry water and pollutants from the troposphere into the otherwise very dry stratosphere, where they can have a significant impact on radiative and chemical processes, potentially including destruction of stratospheric ozone. The DCOTSS field campaign is a NASA Earth Venture Suborbital research project aimed at investigating these thunderstorms. DCOTSS utilizes NASA’s ER-2 aircraft and conducted two ~8-week science deployments based out of Salina, KS spanning early to late summer.

    Links: Temporal Extent: Spatial Extent:
    Polygon: -90 -180 -90 180 90 180 90 -180 -90 -180

    LARC_ASDC Short Name: DCOTSS-Model-Output Version ID: 1 Unique ID: C2276336408-LARC_ASDC

  • Dynamics and Chemistry of the Summer Stratosphere Radar and Satellite (Remote Sensing) Data Products

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C2276362394-LARC_ASDC.xml
    Description:

    DCOTSS-Radar-Satellite-Data feature the radar and satellite data products for the Dynamics and Chemistry of the Summer Stratosphere sub-orbital campaign. Featured in this product are NEXRAD WSR-88D radar products and GOES-16 and GOES-17 geostationary satellite imagery and derived products. NEXRAD GridRad data were produced at a 10-minute frequency across the contiguous United States to support forecasting and flight planning activities. GridRad data also include volumes of radar reflectivity at horizontal polarization and radial velocity spectrum width, which were primarily used to identify tropopause-overshooting convection. Identified GridRad overshoots, which rely upon ERA5 tropopause heights, are included in separate daily files. Also included are GOES-16 and GOES-17 satellite products. Tropopause-overshooting convection is also identified using GOES visible and infrared geostationary satellite imagery. These products include derived cloud top altitude, convective overshoot probability, and visible texture rating product and are produced in 10-minute intervals. The product domain extends over North America and encompasses most of Mexico and Canada. The satellite overshoot products complement the GridRad products and enable an understanding of overshooting that occurs outside the NEXRAD network. Data collection for this product is ongoing and currently only features the first deployment. Each summer the North American Monsoon Anticyclone (NAMA) dominates the circulation of the North-Western Hemisphere and acts to partially confine and isolate air from the surrounding atmosphere. Strong convective storms in the NAMA regularly reach altitudes deep into the lower stratosphere, with some ascending above 20 km. These storms carry water and pollutants from the troposphere into the otherwise very dry stratosphere, where they can have a significant impact on radiative and chemical processes, potentially including destruction of stratospheric ozone. The Dynamics and Chemistry of the Summer Stratosphere (DCOTSS) field campaign is a NASA Earth Venture Suborbital research project aimed at investigating these thunderstorms. DCOTSS utilizes NASA’s ER-2 aircraft and conducted two ~8-week science deployments based out of Salina, KS spanning early to late summer.

    Links: Temporal Extent: Spatial Extent:
    Polygon: 10 -135 10 -60 55 -60 55 -135 10 -135

    LARC_ASDC Short Name: DCOTSS-Radar-Satellite-Data Version ID: 1 Unique ID: C2276362394-LARC_ASDC

  • FIREX-AQ Satellite And Related Ancillary Data

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C2163554173-LARC_ASDC.xml
    Description:

    FIREXAQ_Satellite_Data are supplementary satellite and related ancillary data collected during FIREX-AQ. This product includes data from the VIIRS, GOES-16, and GOES-17 satellites. Data collection for this product is complete. Completed during summer 2019, FIREX-AQ utilized a combination of instrumented airplanes, satellites, and ground-based instrumentation. Detailed fire plume sampling was carried out by the NASA DC-8 aircraft, which had a comprehensive instrument payload capable of measuring over 200 trace gas species, as well as aerosol microphysical, optical, and chemical properties. The DC-8 aircraft completed 23 science flights, including 15 flights from Boise, Idaho and 8 flights from Salina, Kansas. NASA’s ER-2 completed 11 flights, partially in support of the FIREX-AQ effort. The ER-2 payload was made up of 8 satellite analog instruments and provided critical fire information, including fire temperature, fire plume heights, and vegetation/soil albedo information. NOAA provided the NOAA-CHEM Twin Otter and the NOAA-MET Twin Otter aircraft to measure chemical processing in the lofted plumes of Western wildfires. The NOAA-CHEM Twin Otter focused on nighttime plume chemistry, from which data is archived at the NASA Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC). The NOAA-MET Twin Otter collected measurements of air movements at fire boundaries with the goal of understanding the local weather impacts of fires and the movement patterns of fires. NOAA-MET Twin Otter data will be archived at the ASDC in the future. Additionally, a ground-based station in McCall, Idaho and several mobile laboratories provided in-situ measurements of aerosol microphysical and optical properties, aerosol chemical compositions, and trace gas species. The Fire Influence on Regional to Global Environments and Air Quality (FIREX-AQ) campaign was a NOAA/NASA interagency intensive study of North American fires to gain an understanding on the integrated impact of the fire emissions on the tropospheric chemistry and composition and to assess the satellite’s capability for detecting fires and estimating fire emissions. The overarching goal of FIREX-AQ was to provide measurements of trace gas and aerosol emissions for wildfires and prescribed fires in great detail, relate them to fuel and fire conditions at the point of emission, characterize the conditions relating to plume rise, and follow plumes downwind to understand chemical transformation and air quality impacts. Data collection is complete.

    Links: Temporal Extent: Spatial Extent:
    Polygon: 10 -136 10 -74 65 -74 65 -136 10 -136

    LARC_ASDC Short Name: FIREXAQ_Satellite_Data Version ID: 2 Unique ID: C2163554173-LARC_ASDC

  • GHRSST NOAA/STAR GOES-17 ABI L3C America Region SST v2.71 dataset in GDS2

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C2036877645-POCLOUD.xml
    Description:

    The ACSPO G17/ABI L3C (Level 3 Collated) product is a gridded version of the ACSPO G17/ABI L2P product available at https://podaac.jpl.nasa.gov/dataset/ABI_G17-STAR-L2P-v2.71. The L3C output files are 1hr granules in NetCDF4 format, compliant with the GHRSST Data Specification version 2 (GDS2). Due to the loop heat pipe (LHP) issue on G17 ABI, there are only 13 granules available per 24hr interval, from 20UTC to 08UTC, followed by a break from 09UTC to 19UTC, with a total data volume of 0.1GB/day. Valid SSTs are found over oceans, sea, lakes or rivers, with fill values reported elsewhere. The following additional layers are also reported: SST, ACSPO clear-sky mask (ACSM; provided in each grid as part of l2p_flags, which also includes day/night, land, ice, twilight, and glint flags), NCEP wind speed and ACSPO SST minus reference (Canadian Met Centre 0.1deg L4 SST; available at https://podaac.jpl.nasa.gov/dataset/CMC0.1deg-CMC-L4-GLOB-v3.0 ). All valid SSTs in L3C are recommended for users, although data over internal waters may not have enough in situ data to be adequately validated. Per GDS2 specifications, two additional Sensor-Specific Error Statistics layers (bias and standard deviation) are reported in each pixel with valid SST. The ACSPO VIIRS L3U product is monitored and validated against iQuam in situ data (Xu and Ignatov, 2014) in SQUAM (Dash et al, 2010).

    Links: Temporal Extent: Spatial Extent:
    Minimum Bounding Rectangle: -60 163 60 -77

    POCLOUD Short Name: ABI_G17-STAR-L3C-v2.71 Version ID: 2.71 Unique ID: C2036877645-POCLOUD

  • GHRSST NOAA/STAR GOES-17 ABI L2P America Region SST v2.71 dataset (GDS version 2)

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C2213638053-GHRSSTCWIC.xml
    Description:

    GOES-17 (G17) is the second satellite in the US NOAA's GOES-R series. It was launched on 1 Mar 2018 in an interim position at 89.5-deg W for initial Cal/Val, moved to its nominal position at 137.2-deg W in Nov 2018, and declared NOAA operational GOES-West satellite on 12 Feb 2019. Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) is a 16 channel sensor, of which five (3.9, 8.4, 10.3, 11.2, 12.3 um) are suitable for SST. From altitude 35,800km, G17/ABI maps SST in a Full Disk (FD) area from 163E-77W and 60S-60N, with spatial resolution 2km/nadir to 15km/VZA 67-deg, and 10-min temporal sampling. The ABI L2P SST is derived at the native sensor resolution using NOAA ACSPO system. ACSPO processes every 10-min FD, identifies good-quality ocean pixels (Petrenko et al., 2010) and derives SST using Non-Linear SST (NLSST) algorithm (Petrenko et al., 2014). Unfortunately, the G17 ABI loop heat pipe (LHP) that should maintain the ABI at its intended temperature, is not operating at its designed capacity, which required mitigations to the ACSPO algorithms and releasing an updated ACSPO version 2.71 (Pennybacker et al, 2019). In particular, band 11.2um, most subject to calibration problems, is not used leading to a 3-band (8.4, 10.3, and 12.3um) NLSST, and increased calibration problems prevent SST retrievals at night. As a result, the G17 SST is only reported for 13 out of 24hrs/day, from 20UTC to 08UTC. The 10-min FD data are subsequently collated in time, to produce 1-hr product, with improved coverage and reduced cloud leakages and image noise. The collation algorithm also reduces G17 excessive sensor noise and striping to levels similar to G16. The collated SSTs are only reported over clear-sky water pixels. All pixels with valid SSTs are recommended for use. The L2P is reported in NetCDF4 GDS2 format, 13 granules per day, with a total data volume 0.3GB/day. ACSPO files also report sun-sensor geometry, wind speed and l2p_flags (day/night, land, ice, twilight, glint flags). Per GDS2 specifications, two Sensor-Specific Error Statistics (bias and standard deviation) are reported in each pixel (Petrenko et al., 2016). Pixel earth locations are not reported in the granules, as they remain unchanged from granule to granule. Those can be obtained using a flat lat/lon file or a Python script available at https://podaac-tools.jpl.nasa.gov/drive/files/allData/ghrsst/data/GDS2/L2P/GOES17/STAR/nav. The ACSPO G17 ABI SSTs are continuously validated in SQUAM (Dash et al, 2010). A reduced size (0.1GB/day), 0.02-deg equal-angle gridded L3C product is also available.

    Links: Temporal Extent: Spatial Extent:
    Minimum Bounding Rectangle: -59 -135 59 -15

    GHRSSTCWIC Short Name: gov.noaa.nodc:GHRSST-ABI_G17-STAR-L2P Version ID: 2.71 Unique ID: C2213638053-GHRSSTCWIC

  • GHRSST NOAA/STAR GOES-17 ABI L2P America Region SST v2.71 dataset in GDS2

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C2036877626-POCLOUD.xml
    Description:

    GOES-17 (G17) is the second satellite in the US NOAA's GOES-R series. It was launched on 1 Mar 2018 in an interim position at 89.5-deg W for initial Cal/Val, moved to its nominal position at 137.2-deg W in Nov 2018, and declared NOAA operational GOES-West satellite on 12 Feb 2019. Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) is a 16 channel sensor, of which five (3.9, 8.4, 10.3, 11.2, 12.3 um) are suitable for SST. From altitude 35,800km, G17/ABI maps SST in a Full Disk (FD) area from 163E-77W and 60S-60N, with spatial resolution 2km/nadir to 15km/VZA 67-deg, and 10-min temporal sampling. The ABI L2P SST is derived at the native sensor resolution using NOAA ACSPO system. ACSPO processes every 10-min FD, identifies good-quality ocean pixels (Petrenko et al., 2010) and derives SST using Non-Linear SST (NLSST) algorithm (Petrenko et al., 2014). Unfortunately, the G17 ABI loop heat pipe (LHP) that should maintain the ABI at its intended temperature, is not operating at its designed capacity, which required mitigations to the ACSPO algorithms and releasing an updated ACSPO version 2.71 (Pennybacker et al, 2019). In particular, band 11.2um, most subject to calibration problems, is not used leading to a 3-band (8.4, 10.3, and 12.3um) NLSST, and increased calibration problems prevent SST retrievals at night. As a result, the G17 SST is only reported for 13 out of 24hrs/day, from 20UTC to 08UTC. The 10-min FD data are subsequently collated in time, to produce 1-hr product, with improved coverage and reduced cloud leakages and image noise. The collation algorithm also reduces G17 excessive sensor noise and striping to levels similar to G16. The collated SSTs are only reported over clear-sky water pixels. All pixels with valid SSTs are recommended for use. The L2P is reported in NetCDF4 GDS2 format, 13 granules per day, with a total data volume 0.3GB/day. ACSPO files also report sun-sensor geometry, wind speed and l2p_flags (day/night, land, ice, twilight, glint flags). Per GDS2 specifications, two Sensor-Specific Error Statistics (bias and standard deviation) are reported in each pixel (Petrenko et al., 2016). Pixel earth locations are not reported in the granules, as they remain unchanged from granule to granule. Those can be obtained using a flat lat/lon file or a Python script (see Documentation page). The ACSPO G17 ABI SSTs are continuously validated in SQUAM (Dash et al, 2010). A reduced size (0.1GB/day), 0.02-deg equal-angle gridded L3C product is available at https://podaac.jpl.nasa.gov/dataset/ABI_G17-STAR-L3C-v2.71.

    Links: Temporal Extent: Spatial Extent:
    Minimum Bounding Rectangle: -60 163 60 -77

    POCLOUD Short Name: ABI_G17-STAR-L2P-v2.71 Version ID: 2.71 Unique ID: C2036877626-POCLOUD

  • GHRSST NOAA/STAR GOES-17 ABI L3C America Region SST v2.71 dataset (GDS version 2)

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C2213636950-GHRSSTCWIC.xml
    Description:

    The ACSPO G17/ABI L3C (Level 3 Collated) product is a gridded version of the ACSPO G17/ABI L2P product. The L3C output files are 1hr granules in NetCDF4 format, compliant with the GHRSST Data Specification version 2 (GDS2). Due to the loop heat pipe (LHP) issue on G17 ABI, there are only 13 granules available per 24hr interval, from 20UTC to 08UTC, followed by a break from 09UTC to 19UTC, with a total data volume of 0.1GB/day. Valid SSTs are found over oceans, sea, lakes or rivers, with fill values reported elsewhere. The following additional layers are also reported: SST, ACSPO clear-sky mask (ACSM; provided in each grid as part of l2p_flags, which also includes day/night, land, ice, twilight, and glint flags), NCEP wind speed and ACSPO SST minus reference (Canadian Met Centre 0.1deg L4 SST). All valid SSTs in L3C are recommended for users, although data over internal waters may not have enough in situ data to be adequately validated. Per GDS2 specifications, two additional Sensor-Specific Error Statistics layers (bias and standard deviation) are reported in each pixel with valid SST. The ACSPO VIIRS L3U product is monitored and validated against iQuam in situ data (Xu and Ignatov, 2014) in SQUAM (Dash et al, 2010).

    Links: Temporal Extent: Spatial Extent:
    Minimum Bounding Rectangle: -59 -135 59 -15

    GHRSSTCWIC Short Name: gov.noaa.nodc:GHRSST-ABI_G17-STAR-L3C Version ID: 2.71 Unique ID: C2213636950-GHRSSTCWIC

  • GOES-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) Gridded Data Products

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C2278812167-GHRC_DAAC.xml
    Description:

    The GOES-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) Gridded Data Products consist of full disk extent gridded lightning flash data collected by the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) onboard the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite 16 and 17 (GOES-16 and GOES-17). These satellites are a part of the GOES-R series program: a four satellite series within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA) GOES program. GLM is the first operational geostationary optical lightning detector that provides total lightning data (in-cloud, cloud-to-cloud, and cloud-to-ground flashes). While it detects each of these types of lightning, the GLM is unable to distinguish between each type. The GLM GOES L3 dataset files contain gridded lightning flash data over the Western Hemisphere in netCDF-4 format from December 31, 2017 to present as this is an ongoing dataset.

    Links: Temporal Extent: Spatial Extent:
    Minimum Bounding Rectangle: -57 162.9 57 -76.2

    GHRC_DAAC Short Name: glmgoesL3 Version ID: 1 Unique ID: C2278812167-GHRC_DAAC

  • SatCORPS CERES GEO Edition 4 GOES-17 Northern Hemisphere Version 1.2

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C1990752708-LARC_ASDC.xml
    Description:

    CER_GEO_Ed4_GOE17_NH_V01.2 is the Satellite Cloud and Radiation Property retrieval System (SatCORPS) Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Geostationary Satellite (GEO) Edition 4 Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite 17 (GOES-17) over the Northern Hemisphere (NH) Version 1.2 data product. Data was collected using an Imager on the GOES-17 Platform. Data collection for this product is in progress. This data set comprises cloud micro-physical and radiation properties derived hourly from GOES-17 geostationary satellite imager data using the Langley Research Center (LaRC) SATCORPS algorithms supporting the CERES project. Each active geostationary satellite's cloud microphysical and radiation properties are merged to create hourly global cloud properties that estimate fluxes between CERES instrument measurements to account for the changing diurnal cycle. The data set is arranged as files for each hour and in netCDF-4 format. The observations are at 4 km resolution (at nadir) and are sub-sampled to 8 km. CERES is a key Earth Observing System (EOS) program component. The CERES instruments provide radiometric measurements of the Earth's atmosphere from three broadband channels. The CERES missions follow the successful Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) mission. The first CERES instrument, the proto flight model (PFM), was launched on November 27, 1997, as part of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). Two CERES instruments (FM1 and FM2) were launched into polar orbit onboard the Earth Observing System (EOS) flagship Terra on December 18, 1999. Two additional CERES instruments (FM3 and FM4) were launched onboard Earth Observing System (EOS) Aqua on May 4, 2002. The CERES FM5 instrument was launched onboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) satellite on October 28, 2011. The newest CERES instrument (FM6) was launched onboard the Joint Polar-Orbiting Satellite System 1 (JPSS-1) satellite, now called NOAA-20, on November 18, 2017.

    Links: Temporal Extent: Spatial Extent:
    Polygon: 0 -180 0 -90 60 -90 60 -180 0 -180

    LARC_ASDC Short Name: CER_GEO_Ed4_GOE17_NH Version ID: V01.2 Unique ID: C1990752708-LARC_ASDC