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Using the NASA EOSDIS Common Metadata Repository

Collection Search

  • Global Data Base of Monthly Mean Cloud and Surface Properties

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C1214584387-SCIOPS.xml
    Description:

    Global monthly means were obtained from ISCCP C1 data, which is available every 3 hours at 2.5 degree equal area spatial resolution. The monthly mean maps were replicated to a 2.5 degree square grid (144 longitude boxes by 72 latitude boxes). Monthly means are provided for Cloud Amount (CLDAMT), Cloud Top Temperature (CLDTMP), Cloud Top Pressure (CLDPRS), Cloud Optical Thickness (OPTTHK), Surface Temperature (SRFTMP), and Surface Reflectance (SRFRFL).

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    SCIOPS Short Name: ISCCPC1 Version ID: 1 Unique ID: C1214584387-SCIOPS

  • International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) Stage B3 Reduced Radiances in Native Format

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C7994310-LARC_ASDC.xml
    Description:

    The ISCCP_B3_NAT data is the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) Stage B3 Reduced Radiances in Native Format data product. This is the original radiance data, sampled to 30 Km and 3-hour spacing. Data collection for this product is complete and was collected using several instruments on multiple platforms, please see the instrument and platform list of this record for a comprehensive list. The normalization of all radiances to a standard calibration made these data a globally uniform set of measurements that can be used for detailed cloud process studies. ISCCP was the first project of the World Climate Research Program (WCRP) and was established in 1982 (WMO-35 1982, Schiffer and Rossow 1983) to: produce a global, reduced resolution, calibrated and normalized radiance data set containing basic information on the properties of the atmosphere from which cloud parameters can be derived; stimulate and coordinate basic research on techniques for inferring the physical properties of clouds from the condensed radiance data set and to apply the resulting algorithms to derive and validate a global cloud climatology for improving the parameterization of clouds in climate models; and promote research using ISCCP data that contributes to improved understanding of the Earth's radiation budget and hydrological cycle. Since 1983 an international group of institutions has collected and analyzed satellite radiance measurements from up to five geostationary and two polar orbiting satellites to infer the global distribution of cloud properties and their diurnal, seasonal and inter-annual variations. The primary focus of the first phase of the project (1983-1995) was the elucidation of the role of clouds in the radiation budget (top of the atmosphere and surface). In the second phase of the project (1995 onwards) the analysis also concerns improving understanding of clouds in the global hydrological cycle. ISCCP analysis combined satellite-measured radiances (Stage B3 data, Schiffer and Rossow 1985), Rossow et al. 1987) with the TOVS atmospheric temperature-humidity and ice/snow correlative data sets to obtain information about clouds and the surface. The analysis method first determined the presence of absence of clouds in each individual image pixel and retrieves the radiometric properties of the cloud for each cloudy pixel and of the surface for each clear pixel. The pixel analysis is performed separately for each satellite radiance data set and the results reported in the Stage DX data product, which has a nominal resolution of 30 km and 3 hours. The Stage D1 product is produced by summarizing the pixel-level results every 3 hours on an equal-area map with 280 km resolution and merging the results from separate satellites with the atmospheric and ice/snow data sets to produce global coverage at each time. The Stage D2 data product is produced by averaging the Stage D1 data over each month, first at each of the eight three hour time intervals and then over all time intervals.

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    LARC_ASDC Short Name: ISCCP_B3_NAT Version ID: 1 Unique ID: C7994310-LARC_ASDC

  • International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) Stage D1 3-Hourly Cloud Products - Revised Algorithm in Hierarchical Data Format

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C2146773048-LARC_ASDC.xml
    Description:

    ISCCP_D1_1 is the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) Stage D1 3-Hourly Cloud Products - Revised Algorithm data set in Hierarchical Data Format. This data set contains 3-hourly, 280 KM equal-area grid data from various polar and geostationary satellites. The Gridded Cloud Product contents are spatial averages of DX quantities and statistical summaries, including properties of cloud types. Satellites are merged into a global grid. Atmosphere and surface properties from TOVS are appended. Data collection for this data set is complete. ISCCP, the first project of the World Climate Research Program (WCRP), was established in 1982 (WMO-35 1982, Schiffer and Rossow 1983) to: produce a global, reduced resolution, calibrated and normalized radiance data set containing basic information on the properties of the atmosphere from which cloud parameters can be derived; stimulate and coordinate basic research on techniques for inferring the physical properties of clouds from the condensed radiance data set and to apply the resulting algorithms to derive and validate a global cloud climatology for improving the parameterization of clouds in climate models; and promote research using ISCCP data that contributes to improved understanding of the Earth's radiation budget and hydrological cycle. Starting in 1983 an international group of institutions collected and analyzed satellite radiance measurements from up to five geostationary and two polar orbiting satellites to infer the global distribution of cloud properties and their diurnal, seasonal and interannual variations. The primary focus of the first phase of the project (1983-1995) was the elucidation of the role of clouds in the radiation budget (top of the atmosphere and surface). In the second phase of the project (1995 onward) the analysis also concerns improving understanding of clouds in the global hydrological cycle. The ISCCP analysis combined satellite-measured radiances (Stage B3 data, Schiffer and Rossow 1985), Rossow et al. 1987) with the TOVS atmospheric temperature-humidity and ice/snow correlative data sets to obtain information about clouds and the surface. The analysis method first determined the presence of absence of clouds in each individual image pixel and retrieves the radiometric properties of the cloud for each cloudy pixel and of the surface for each clear pixel. The pixel analysis was performed separately for each satellite radiance data set and the results were reported in the Stage DX data product, which had a nominal resolution of 30 km and 3 hours. The Stage D1 product was produced by summarizing the pixel-level results every 3 hours on an equal-area map with 280 km resolution and merging the results from separate satellites with the atmospheric and ice/snow data sets to produce global coverage at each time. The Stage D2 data product was produced by averaging the Stage D1 data over each month, first at each of the eight three hour time intervals and then over all time intervals.

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    LARC_ASDC Short Name: ISCCP_D1 Version ID: 1 Unique ID: C2146773048-LARC_ASDC

  • International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) Stage D2 Monthly Cloud Products - Revised Algorithm in Hierarchical Data Format

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C2146747804-LARC_ASDC.xml
    Description:

    The ISCCP_D2 data set contains monthly, 280 KM equal-area grid data from various polar and geostationary satellites. Climatological Summary Product contents contain monthly average of D1 quantities including mean diurnal cycle, distribution and properties of total cloudiness and cloud types. The International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP), the first project of the World Climate Research Program (WCRP), was established in 1982 (WMO-35 1982, Schiffer and Rossow 1983): - To produce a global, reduced resolution, calibrated and normalized radiance data set containing basic information on the properties of the atmosphere from which cloud parameters can be derived. - To stimulate and coordinate basic research on techniques for inferring the physical properties of clouds from the condensed radiance data set and to apply the resulting algorithms to derive and validate a global cloud climatology for improving the parameterization of clouds in climate models. - To promote research using ISCCP data that contributes to improved understanding of the Earth's radiation budget and hydrological cycle. Since 1983 an international group of institutions has collected and analyzed satellite radiance measurements from up to five geostationary and two polar orbiting satellites to infer the global distribution of cloud properties and their diurnal, seasonal and interannual variations. The primary focus of the first phase of the project (1983-1995) was the elucidation of the role of clouds in the radiation budget (top of the atmosphere and surface). In the second phase of the project (1995 onwards) the analysis also concerns improving understanding of clouds in the global hydrological cycle. The ISCCP analysis combines satellite-measured radiances (Stage B3 data, Schiffer and Rossow 1985), Rossow et al. 1987) with the TOVS atmospheric temperature-humidity and ice/snow correlative data sets to obtain information about clouds and the surface. The analysis method first determines the presence of absence of clouds in each individual image pixel and retrieves the radiometric properties of the cloud for each cloudy pixel and of the surface for each clear pixel. The pixel analysis is performed separately for each satellite radiance data set and the results reported in the Stage DX data product, which has a nominal resolution of 30 km and 3 hours. The Stage D1 product is produced by summarizing the pixel-level results every 3 hours on an equal-area map with 280 km resolution and merging the results from separate satellites with the atmospheric and ice/snow data sets to produce global coverage at each time. The Stage D2 data product is produced by averaging the Stage D1 data over each month, first at each of the eight three hour time intervals and then over all time intervals.

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    LARC_ASDC Short Name: ISCCP_D2 Version ID: 1 Unique ID: C2146747804-LARC_ASDC

  • International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) Stage DX Pixel Level Cloud Product - Revised Algorithm in Hierarchical Data Format

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C2147305318-LARC_ASDC.xml
    Description:

    ISCCP_DX_1 is the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) Stage DX Pixel Level Cloud Product - Revised Algorithm in Hierarchical Data Format data set. It contains 3-hourly, 30 KM satellite image projection data from various polar and geostationary satellites. Pixel Level Cloud Product contents include calibrated radiances, cloud detection results, cloud and surface properties from radiative analysis. Data collection for this data set is complete. ISCCP was the first project of the World Climate Research Program (WCRP) and was established in 1982 (WMO-35 1982, Schiffer and Rossow 1983) to: produce a global, reduced resolution, calibrated and normalized radiance data set containing basic information on the properties of the atmosphere from which cloud parameters can be derived; stimulate and coordinate basic research on techniques for inferring the physical properties of clouds from the condensed radiance data set and to apply the resulting algorithms to derive and validate a global cloud climatology for improving the parameterization of clouds in climate models; and promote research using ISCCP data that contributes to improved understanding of the Earth's radiation budget and hydrological cycle. Starting in 1983 an international group of institutions collected and analyzed satellite radiance measurements from up to five geostationary and two polar orbiting satellites to infer the global distribution of cloud properties and their diurnal, seasonal and inter-annual variations. The primary focus of the first phase of the project (1983-1995) was the elucidation of the role of clouds in the radiation budget (top of the atmosphere and surface). In the second phase of the project (1995 onward) the analysis was also concerned with improving understanding of clouds in the global hydrological cycle. The ISCCP analysis combined satellite-measured radiances (Stage B3 data, Schiffer and Rossow 1985), Rossow et al. 1987) with the Tiros Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) atmospheric temperature-humidity and ice/snow correlative data sets to obtain information about clouds and the surface. The analysis method first determined the presence of absence of clouds in each individual image pixel and retrieved the radiometric properties of the cloud for each cloudy pixel and of the surface for each clear pixel. The pixel analysis was performed separately for each satellite radiance data set and the results were reported in the Stage DX data product, which had a nominal resolution of 30 km and 3 hours. The Stage D1 product was produced by summarizing the pixel-level results every 3 hours on an equal-area map with 280 km resolution and merging the results from separate satellites with the atmospheric and ice/snow data sets to produce global coverage at each time. The Stage D2 data product was produced by averaging the Stage D1 data over each month, first at each of the eight three hour time intervals and then over all time intervals.

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    LARC_ASDC Short Name: ISCCP_DX Version ID: 1 Unique ID: C2147305318-LARC_ASDC

  • Past and Present Weather Data and Analysis Software from Unidata via WWW

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C1214585510-SCIOPS.xml
    Description:

    http://unidata.ucar.edu/ Participation in the Unidata community allows users (primarily educators and researchers), to access data and visualization software to explore earth-system phenomena. Multidisciplinary from its origins in 1983, the community hosts participants from atmospheric science, hydrology, oceanography, climatology, engineering, and environmental science among other disciplines; though its primary focus is meteorology. Key to Unidata's success is its active, dynamic community. While the Unidata Program Center (UPC), based in Boulder, CO, is the community's virtual and geographic hub, interaction among community members takes many paths, not all of them radiating from the UPC. The Internet Data Distribution (IDD), a near real-time data distribution topology, is an excellent example of community members sharing data resources. Over 150 University departments and research laboratories participate in the IDD. Unidata is governed by its community. Acting as its board of directors, the Policy Commitee works to strategically guide the UPC. The Users Committee (which reports to the Policy Committee), gives voice to the entire Unidata community by providing the UPC with feedback on how it can be the most effective. [Summary Extracted from the Unidata Home Page]

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    SCIOPS Short Name: UNIDATA Version ID: Not provided Unique ID: C1214585510-SCIOPS

  • Surface Radiation Budget (SRB) Release 3.0 Shortwave 3 hourly monthly UTC data in netcdf format

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C2184128386-LARC_ASDC.xml
    Description:

    The data set contains monthly average/3-hourly (also calleddiurnally-resolved monthly average or just 'diurnal' for brevity) global fieldsof 11 shortwave (SW) surface radiative parameters derived with the Shortwavealgorithm of the NASA World Climate Research Programme /Global Energy andWater-Cycle Experiment (WCRP/GEWEX) Surface Radiation Budget (SRB) Project.The data is generated using the Pinker/Laszlo shortwave algorithm (R.T. Pinkerand I. Laszlo, 1992: Modeling Surface Solar Irradiance for SatelliteApplications on a Global Scale, J. Appl. Met., 31, 194-211).These parameters were derived originally on a 3-hourly temporal resolution(i.e., a global instantaneous gridded field every 3 hours), at UT hours 00, 03,06, 09, 12, 15, 18, and 21 for every day of the month. The 3-hourly values wereused to compute monthly averages separately for each of the 8 UT hours. Thecurrent version of the data is identified as Release 3.0.

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    LARC_ASDC Short Name: SRB_REL3.0_SW_3HRLY_MONTHLY_UTC_NC Version ID: 1 Unique ID: C2184128386-LARC_ASDC