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  • Earth Radiation area average time series through Wide-field-of-view nonscanner abroad Earth Radiation Budget Satellite

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C1407077722-LARC_ASDC.xml
    Description:

    Understanding the mean and variability of the Earth’s radiation budget (ERB) at the Top-of-Atmosphere (TOA) and surface is a fundamental quantity governing climate variability and, for that reason, NASA has been making concerted efforts to observe the ERB since1984 through two projects: ERBE and CERES, that span nearly 30 years to date. The proposed project utilizes knowledge gained in the last 10 years through CERES data analyses and apply the knowledge to existing data to develop long-term (nearly 30 years) consistent and calibrated data product (TOA irradiances at the same radiometric scale) from multiple missions (ERBS and CERES). This project proposes to produce level 3 surface irradiance products that are consistent with observed TOA irradiances in a framework of 1D radiative transfer theory. Based on these TOA and surface irradiance products, a data product will be developed which contains the contribution of atmospheric and cloud property variability to TOA and surface irradiance variability. All algorithms used in the process are based on existing CERES algorithms. All data sets produced by this project will be available from the Atmospheric Science Data Center.

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    LARC_ASDC Short Name: ERBE_S10N_WFOV_SF_ERBS_AreaAverageTimeSeries_Edition4 Version ID: 4 Unique ID: C1407077722-LARC_ASDC

  • Earth Radiation area average time series through Wide-field-of-view nonscanner abroad Earth Radiation Budget Satellite Edition 4.1

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C1962671350-LARC_ASDC.xml
    Description:

    ERBE_S10N_WFOV_SF_ERBS_AreaAverageTimeSeries is the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) through Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) area average time series through Wide-field-of-view nonscanner abroad Earth Radiation Budget Satellite Edition 4.1 data product. Understanding the mean and variability of the Earth’s radiation budget (ERB) at the Top-of-Atmosphere (TOA) and surface is a fundamental quantity governing climate variability and, for that reason, NASA has been making concerted efforts to observe the ERB since1984 through two projects: ERBE and Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES), that span nearly 30 years to date. The ERBE MEaSUREs project uses knowledge gained in the last 10 years through CERES data analyses and applies the knowledge to existing data to develop long-term (nearly 30 years) consistent and calibrated data product (TOA irradiances at the same radiometric scale) from multiple missions (ERBS and CERES). This project proposes to produce level 3 surface irradiance products that are consistent with observed TOA irradiances in a framework of 1D radiative transfer theory. Based on these TOA and surface irradiance products, a data product will be developed which contains the contribution of atmospheric and cloud property variability to TOA and surface irradiance variability. All algorithms used in the process are based on existing CERES algorithms. All data sets produced by this project will be available from the Atmospheric Science Data Center.

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    Polygon: -90 -180 -90 180 90 180 90 -180 -90 -180

    LARC_ASDC Short Name: ERBE_S10N_WFOV_SF_ERBS_AreaAverageTimeSeries Version ID: Edition4.1 Unique ID: C1962671350-LARC_ASDC

  • Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) Nonscanner Regional, Zonal, and Global Averages S-4N data in native format

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C1000000744-LARC_ASDC.xml
    Description:

    ERBE_S4N_NAT_1 is the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) Nonscanner Regional, Zonal, and Global Averages S-4N data in native format data set, which contains averages of flux and albedo on regional, zonal, and global scales for non-scanner data processed without scanner scene identification information. Data collection for this data set is complete. The data are represented as 8-bit, 16-bit, and 32-bit integers. ERBE was a multi-satellite system designed to measure the Earth's radiation budget. The ERBE instruments flew on a mid-inclination National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) and two sun-synchronous National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellites (NOAA-9 and NOAA-10). Each satellite carried both a scanner and a non-scanner instrument package. The S-4N contained averages of flux and albedo on regional, zonal, and global scales for non-scanner data. It was available as a combination of all operational spacecraft (ERBS, NOAA-9 and NOAA-10) for the nons-canner wide field-of-view (WFOV) data. The S-4N is a multi-file product which has three files of WFOV numerical filter and three files of WFOV shape factor data. Monthly (day), monthly (hour), daily, and monthly hourly averages are determined for each region.

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    LARC_ASDC Short Name: ERBE_S4N_NAT Version ID: 1 Unique ID: C1000000744-LARC_ASDC

  • Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) Nonscanner S-4G MediumField of View (MFOV) Shape Factor (SF) Zonal and Global Averages

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C1000000772-LARC_ASDC.xml
    Description:

    ERBE_S4G_MFOV_SF_ZG_1 is the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) Non-scanner S-4G Medium-field of View (MFOV) Shape Factor (SF) Zonal and Global Averages data product. Data collection for this product is complete. This data set consists of non-scanner, medium field-of-view data, which was processed using the shape factor data reduction technique. The data are averaged over latitudinal bands(zones) as well as on a global level in which each parameter is averaged over the entire globe. The zonal averages are available in 10.0 degree resolution. Monthly (day), monthly (hour), daily, and monthly hourly averages are determined for each region. The data are represented as 8-bit, 16-bit, and 32-bit integers. Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) was a multi-satellite system designed to measure the Earth's radiation budget. ERBE instruments flew on a mid-inclination National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) and two sun-synchronous National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellites, NOAA-9 and NOAA-10. NOAA-9 and NOAA-10 provided global coverage and the ERBS provided coverage between 67.5 degrees north and south latitude. Each satellite carried both a scanner and a non-scanner instrument package. The non-scanner instrument contained four Earth-viewing channels and a solar monitor. The Earth-viewing channels had two spatial resolutions: a horizon-to-horizon view of the Earth, and a field-of-view limited to about 1000 km in diameter. The former was called the wide field-of-view (WFOV) and the latter the medium field of view (MFOV) channels. For each of the two fields of view, there was a total spectral channel which is sensitive to all wavelengths and a shortwave channel which used a high purity, fused silica filter dome to transmit only the shortwave radiation from 0.2 to 5 microns. Because of the concern for spectral flatness and high accuracy, all five channels on the non-scanner package were active cavity radiometers. The ERBE S-4G product contained averages of radiant flux and albedo on regional, zonal, and global scales. The data for the S-4G product were arranged by parameter values. The ERBE S-4G WFOV product was available as a combination of all operational spacecraft. Products have been archived from November 1984 - January 1985 and June 1989 - February 1990 for ERBS; February 1985 - October 1986 for ERBS/NOAA-9; November 1986 - January 1987 for ERBS/NOAA-9/NOAA-10; and February 1987 - May 1989 for ERBS/NOAA-10. The various combinations of the satellites reflected the actual duration of the scanners.

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    LARC_ASDC Short Name: ERBE_S4G_MFOV_SF_ZG Version ID: 1 Unique ID: C1000000772-LARC_ASDC

  • Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) Regional, Zonal, and Global Averages S-4 data in native format

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C1000000767-LARC_ASDC.xml
    Description:

    ERBE_S4_NAT_1 is the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) Regional, Zonal, and Global Averages S-4 data in native format data set, which contains space and time averages of flux and albedo on regional, zonal, and global scales for both scanner and non-scanner data in native format. Data collection for this collection is complete. The data are represented as 8-bit, 16-bit, and 32-bit integers. ERBE is a multi-satellite system that was designed to measure the Earth's radiation budget. ERBE instruments flew on a mid-inclination National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) and two sun-synchronous National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellites, NOAA-9 and NOAA-10. NOAA-9 and NOAA-10 provided global coverage and the ERBS provided coverage between 67.5 degrees north and south latitude. Each satellite carried both a scanner and a non-scanner instrument package. The non-scanner instrument contained four Earth-viewing channels and a solar monitor. The Earth-viewing channels had two spatial resolutions: a horizon-to-horizon view of the Earth, and a field-of-view limited to about 1000 km in diameter. The former was called the wide field-of-view (WFOV) and the latter the medium field of view (MFOV) channels. For each of the two fields of view, there was a total spectral channel which was sensitive to all wavelengths and a shortwave channel which used a high purity, fused silica filter dome to transmit only the shortwave radiation from 0.2 to 5 microns. Because of the concern for spectral flatness and high accuracy, all five channels on the non-scanner package were active cavity radiometers. The ERBE S-4G product contained averages of radiant flux and albedo on regional, zonal, and global scales. The data for the S-4G product were arranged by parameter values. ERBE S-4G MFOV product was available as a combination of the ERBS and NOAA-9 spacecraft. Products were archived as a combination of ERBS and NOAA-9 from February 1985 through October 1986. MFOV measurements from NOAA-10 have not been archived.

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    LARC_ASDC Short Name: ERBE_S4_NAT Version ID: 1 Unique ID: C1000000767-LARC_ASDC

  • Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) S-10 Medium Field of View (MFOV) Numerical Filter (NF) Radiant Flux and Albedo

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C1000000741-LARC_ASDC.xml
    Description:

    ERBE_S10_MFOV_NF_NAT_1 is the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) S-10 Medium Field of View (MFOV) Numerical Filter (NF) Radiant Flux and Albedo data product. Data collection for this product is complete. It is available in the Native (NAT) Format. ERBE was a multi-satellite system designed to measure the Earth's radiation budget. The ERBE instruments flew on a mid-inclination National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) and two sun-synchronous National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellites (NOAA-9 and NOAA-10). Each satellite carried both a scanner and a non-scanner instrument package. The non-scanner instrument package contained four Earth-viewing channels and a solar monitor. The Earth-viewing channels had two spatial resolutions: a horizon-to-horizon view of the Earth, and a field-of-view limited to about 1000 km in diameter. The former was called the wide field-of-view (WFOV) and the latter MFOV channels. The solar monitor was a direct descendant of the Solar Maximum Mission's Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor detector. Due to the concern for spectral flatness and high accuracy, all five of the channels were active cavity radiometers. The MFOV (medium-field-of-view) SF (shape factor) S-10 contained inverted daily, monthly hourly, and monthly averages of shortwave and long-wave radiant fluxes at the top-of-the-atmosphere for one month. This data set was produced for each of the satellites (ERBS and NOAA-9) and the combination of satellites, which were operational during the data month. The values for this data set were derived using the shape factor technique (Smith et al. 1986). As described in the Earth Radiant Fluxes and Albedo, Scanner S-9, Non-scanner S-10/S-10N User's Guide, the data contains a 30 byte header, 67 scale factors which were used to scale the data in the first record, and 26 scale factors which were used to scale the data in the second record. The data set also contained two records for each processed region. The first record was of fixed length (990 words) and contained averaged data. The second record was of variable length and contained individual hour box estimates. The length of the second record, in words, was calculated by multiplying the number of hour boxes (978th word of record one) by the number of values stored for each hour box (38 for the non-scanner).

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    Polygon: -90 -180 -90 180 90 180 90 -180 -90 -180

    LARC_ASDC Short Name: ERBE_S10_MFOV_NF_NAT Version ID: 1 Unique ID: C1000000741-LARC_ASDC

  • Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) S-10 Medium Field of View (MFOV) Shape Factor (SF) Radiant Flux and Albedo

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C1000000761-LARC_ASDC.xml
    Description:

    ERBE_S10_MFOV_SF_NAT_1 is the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) S-10 Medium Field of View (MFOV) Shape Factor (SF) Radiant Flux and Albedo data product. Data collection for this product is complete. It is available in the Native (NAT) Format. ERBE was a multi-satellite system designed to measure the Earth's radiation budget. The ERBE instruments flew on a mid-inclination National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) and two sun-synchronous National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellites (NOAA-9 and NOAA-10). Each satellite carried both a scanner and a non-scanner instrument package. The non-scanner instrument package contained four Earth-viewing channels and a solar monitor. The Earth-viewing channels had two spatial resolutions: a horizon-to-horizon view of the Earth, and a field-of-view limited to about 1000 km in diameter. The former was called the wide field-of-view (WFOV) and the latter MFOV channels. The solar monitor was a direct descendant of the Solar Maximum Mission's Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor detector. Due to the concern for spectral flatness and high accuracy, all five of the channels were active cavity radiometers. The MFOV (medium-field-of-view) SF (shape factor) S-10 contained inverted daily, monthly hourly, and monthly averages of shortwave and long-wave radiant fluxes at the top-of-the-atmosphere for one month. This data set was produced for each of the satellites (ERBS and NOAA-9) and the combination of satellites, which were operational during the data month. The values for this data set were derived using the shape factor technique (Smith et al. 1986). As described in the Earth Radiant Fluxes and Albedo, Scanner S-9, Non-scanner S-10/S-10N User's Guide, the data contains a 30 byte header, 67 scale factors which were used to scale the data in the first record, and 26 scale factors which were used to scale the data in the second record. The data set also contained two records for each processed region. The first record was of fixed length (990 words) and contained averaged data. The second record was of variable length and contained individual hour box estimates. The length of the second record, in words, was calculated by multiplying the number of hour boxes (978th word of record one) by the number of values stored for each hour box (38 for the non-scanner).

    Links: Temporal Extent: Spatial Extent:
    Polygon: -90 -180 -90 180 90 180 90 -180 -90 -180

    LARC_ASDC Short Name: ERBE_S10_MFOV_SF_NAT Version ID: 1 Unique ID: C1000000761-LARC_ASDC

  • Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) S-10 Wide Field of View (WFOV) Numerical Filter (NF) Earth Flux and Albedo

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C1000000802-LARC_ASDC.xml
    Description:

    ERBE_S10_WFOV_NF_NAT_1 is the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) S-10 Wide Field of View (WFOV) Numerical Filter (NF) Earth Flux and Albedo data product. Data collection for this product is complete. It is available in the Native (NAT) Format. ERBE was a multi-satellite system designed to measure the Earth's radiation budget. The ERBE instruments flew on a mid-inclination National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) and two sun-synchronous National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellites (NOAA-9 and NOAA-10). Each satellite carried both a scanner and a non-scanner instrument package. The non-scanner instrument package contained four Earth-viewing channels and a solar monitor. The Earth-viewing channels had two spatial resolutions: a horizon-to-horizon view of the Earth, and a field-of-view limited to about 1000 km in diameter. The former was called WFOV and the latter the medium field-of-view (MFOV) channels. The solar monitor was a direct descendant of the Solar Maximum Mission's Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor detector. Due to the concern for spectral flatness and high accuracy, all five of the channels were active cavity radiometers. The MFOV (medium-field-of-view) SF (shape factor) S-10 contained inverted daily, monthly hourly, and monthly averages of shortwave and long-wave radiant fluxes at the top-of-the-atmosphere for one month. This data set was produced for each of the satellites (ERBS and NOAA-9) and the combination of satellites, which were operational during the data month. The values for this data set were derived using the shape factor technique (Smith et al. 1986). As described in the Earth Radiant Fluxes and Albedo, Scanner S-9, Non-scanner S-10/S-10N User's Guide, the data contains a 30 byte header, 67 scale factors which were used to scale the data in the first record, and 26 scale factors which were used to scale the data in the second record. The data set also contained two records for each processed region. The first record was of fixed length (990 words) and contained averaged data. The second record was of variable length and contained individual hour box estimates. The length of the second record, in words, was calculated by multiplying the number of hour boxes (978th word of record one) by the number of values stored for each hour box (38 for the non-scanner).

    Links: Temporal Extent: Spatial Extent:
    Polygon: -90 -180 -90 180 90 180 90 -180 -90 -180

    LARC_ASDC Short Name: ERBE_S10_WFOV_NF_NAT Version ID: 1 Unique ID: C1000000802-LARC_ASDC

  • Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) S-10 Wide Field of View (WFOV) Shape Factor (SF) Earth Flux and Albedo

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C1000000822-LARC_ASDC.xml
    Description:

    ERBE_S10_WFOV_SF_NAT_1 is the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) S-10 Wide Field of View (WFOV) Shape Factor (SF) Earth Flux and Albedo data product. Data collection for this product is complete. It is available in the Native (NAT) Format. ERBE was a multi-satellite system designed to measure the Earth's radiation budget. The ERBE instruments flew on a mid-inclination National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) and two sun-synchronous National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellites (NOAA-9 and NOAA-10). Each satellite carried both a scanner and a non-scanner instrument package. The non-scanner instrument package contained four Earth-viewing channels and a solar monitor. The Earth-viewing channels had two spatial resolutions: a horizon-to-horizon view of the Earth, and a field-of-view limited to about 1000 km in diameter. The former was called WFOV and the latter the medium field-of-view (MFOV) channels. The solar monitor was a direct descendant of the Solar Maximum Mission's Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor detector. Due to the concern for spectral flatness and high accuracy, all five of the channels were active cavity radiometers. The MFOV (medium-field-of-view) SF (shape factor) S-10 contained inverted daily, monthly hourly, and monthly averages of shortwave and long-wave radiant fluxes at the top-of-the-atmosphere for one month. This data set was produced for each of the satellites (ERBS and NOAA-9) and the combination of satellites, which were operational during the data month. The values for this data set were derived using the shape factor technique (Smith et al. 1986). As described in the Earth Radiant Fluxes and Albedo, Scanner S-9, Non-scanner S-10/S-10N User's Guide, the data contains a 30 byte header, 67 scale factors which were used to scale the data in the first record, and 26 scale factors which were used to scale the data in the second record. The data set also contained two records for each processed region. The first record was of fixed length (990 words) and contained averaged data. The second record was of variable length and contained individual hour box estimates. The length of the second record, in words, was calculated by multiplying the number of hour boxes (978th word of record one) by the number of values stored for each hour box (38 for the non-scanner).

    Links: Temporal Extent: Spatial Extent:
    Polygon: -90 -180 -90 180 90 180 90 -180 -90 -180

    LARC_ASDC Short Name: ERBE_S10_WFOV_SF_NAT Version ID: 1 Unique ID: C1000000822-LARC_ASDC

  • Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) S-10N (Nonscanner-only) Wide Field of View (WFOV) Numerical Filter (NF) Earth Flux and Albedo

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C1000000740-LARC_ASDC.xml
    Description:

    ERBE_S10N_WFV_NF_NAT_1 is the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) S-10N (Non-scanner-only) Wide Field of View (WFOV) Numerical Filter (NF) Earth Flux and Albedo data product. Data collection for this product is complete. It is available in the Native (NAT) Format. ERBE was a multi-satellite system designed to measure the Earth's radiation budget. The ERBE instruments flew on a mid-inclination National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) and two sun-synchronous National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellites (NOAA-9 and NOAA-10). Each satellite carried both a scanner and a non-scanner instrument package. The non-scanner instrument package contained four Earth-viewing channels and a solar monitor. The Earth-viewing channels had two spatial resolutions: a horizon-to-horizon view of the Earth, and a field-of-view limited to about 1000 km in diameter. The former was called WFOV and the latter the medium field-of-view (MFOV) channels. The solar monitor was a direct descendant of the Solar Maximum Mission's Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor detector. Due to the concern for spectral flatness and high accuracy, all five of the channels were active cavity radiometers. The MFOV (medium-field-of-view) SF (shape factor) S-10 contained inverted daily, monthly hourly, and monthly averages of shortwave and long-wave radiant fluxes at the top-of-the-atmosphere for one month. This data set was produced for each of the satellites (ERBS and NOAA-9) and the combination of satellites, which were operational during the data month. The values for this data set were derived using the shape factor technique (Smith et al. 1986). As described in the Earth Radiant Fluxes and Albedo, Scanner S-9, Non-scanner S-10/S-10N User's Guide, the data contains a 30 byte header, 67 scale factors which were used to scale the data in the first record, and 26 scale factors which were used to scale the data in the second record. The data set also contained two records for each processed region. The first record was of fixed length (990 words) and contained averaged data. The second record was of variable length and contained individual hour box estimates. The length of the second record, in words, was calculated by multiplying the number of hour boxes (978th word of record one) by the number of values stored for each hour box (38 for the non-scanner).

    Links: Temporal Extent: Spatial Extent:
    Polygon: -90 -180 -90 180 90 180 90 -180 -90 -180

    LARC_ASDC Short Name: ERBE_S10N_WFV_NF_NAT Version ID: 1 Unique ID: C1000000740-LARC_ASDC