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Using the NASA EOSDIS Common Metadata Repository

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  • MEaSUREs InSAR-Based Antarctica Ice Velocity Map V002

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C1414573008-NSIDC_ECS.xml
    Description:

    This data set, part of the NASA Making Earth System Data Records for Use in Research Environments (MEaSUREs) Program, provides the first comprehensive, high-resolution, digital mosaics of ice motion in Antarctica assembled from multiple satellite interferometric, synthetic-aperture radar systems. Data were largely acquired during the International Polar Years 2007 to 2009, as well as between 2013 and 2016. Additional data acquired between 1996 and 2016 were used as needed to maximize coverage. See <a href="https://nsidc.org/data/measures/aiv">Antarctic Ice Sheet Velocity and Mapping Data</a> for related data.

    Links: Temporal Extent: Spatial Extent:
    Minimum Bounding Rectangle: -90 -180 -60 180

    NSIDC_ECS Short Name: NSIDC-0484 Version ID: 2 Unique ID: C1414573008-NSIDC_ECS

  • MEaSUREs InSAR-Based Ice Velocity Maps of Central Antarctica: 1997 and 2009 V001

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C1353062834-NSIDC_ECS.xml
    Description:

    This data set, part of the NASA Making Earth System Data Records for Use in Research Environments (MEaSUREs) program, consists of two high-resolution digital mosaics of ice motion in Central Antarctica. The mosaics were assembled from satellite interferometric synthetic-aperture radar (InSAR) data acquired by RADARSAT-1 in 1997 and by RADARSAT-2 in 2009. See <a href="https://nsidc.org/data/measures/aiv">Antarctic Ice Sheet Velocity and Mapping Data</a> for related data.

    Links: Temporal Extent: Spatial Extent:
    Minimum Bounding Rectangle: -90 -180 -72 180

    NSIDC_ECS Short Name: NSIDC-0525 Version ID: 1 Unique ID: C1353062834-NSIDC_ECS

  • MEaSUREs InSAR-Based Ice Velocity of the Amundsen Sea Embayment, Antarctica V001

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C1353062858-NSIDC_ECS.xml
    Description:

    This data set, part of the NASA Making Earth System Data Records for Use in Research Environments (MEaSUREs) Program, provides high-resolution, digital mosaics of ice motion in the Amundsen Sea Embayment (ASE) and West Antarctica, including the Pine Island, Thwaites, Haynes, Pope, Smith, and Kohler glaciers. The mosaics were assembled from interferometric synthetic-aperture radar (InSAR) data acquired in 1996, 2000, 2002, and 2006-2012 by various satellites. See <a href="https://nsidc.org/data/measures/aiv">Antarctic Ice Sheet Velocity and Mapping Data</a> for related data.

    Links: Temporal Extent: Spatial Extent:
    Minimum Bounding Rectangle: -80.4614 -127.3826 -71.9876 82.8345

    NSIDC_ECS Short Name: NSIDC-0545 Version ID: 1 Unique ID: C1353062858-NSIDC_ECS

  • MEaSUREs Multi-year Greenland Ice Sheet Velocity Mosaic V001

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C1418998752-NSIDC_ECS.xml
    Description:

    This data set, part of the NASA Making Earth System Data Records for Use in Research Environments (MEaSUREs) program, contains a multi-year ice-sheet-wide velocity mosaic for Greenland, derived from Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), and Landsat 8 optical imagery data. See <a href="http://nsidc.org/data/measures/gimp">Greenland Ice Mapping Project (GIMP)</a> for related data.

    Links: Temporal Extent: Spatial Extent:
    Minimum Bounding Rectangle: 60 -75 83 -14

    NSIDC_ECS Short Name: NSIDC-0670 Version ID: 1 Unique ID: C1418998752-NSIDC_ECS

  • MEaSUREs Phase-Based Antarctica Ice Velocity Map, Version 1

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C1626249702-NSIDCV0.xml
    Description:

    This data set, as part of the NASA Making Earth System Data Records for Use in Research Environments (MEaSUREs) Program, combines interferometric phases from multiple satellite interferometric synthetic-aperture radar systems to derive the first comprehensive phase-based map of Antarctic ice velocity. The precision in ice speed and flow direction over 80% of Antarctica is better than prior mappings based on feature and speckle tracking by a factor of 10. Phase-derived velocity mostly covers the years between 2007 and 2018, while tracking-derived velocity (for regions along the coasts) is mostly found in the years from 2013 to 2017. Additional data acquired between 1996 and 2018 were used as needed to maximize coverage. See <a href="https://nsidc.org/data/measures/aiv">Antarctic Ice Sheet Velocity and Mapping Data</a> for related data.

    Links: Temporal Extent: Spatial Extent:
    Minimum Bounding Rectangle: -90 -180 -60 180

    NSIDCV0 Short Name: NSIDC-0754 Version ID: 1 Unique ID: C1626249702-NSIDCV0

  • Modelling of microwave scattering in sea ice and radar image classification in Ross Island, Antarctica

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C1214621883-SCIOPS.xml
    Description:

    This data set consists of ground truth measurements of sea ice in Ross Island, Antarctica. In the study of microwave remote sensing, field measurements or in-situ data collections play an important role towards verifying the accuracy of theoretical models. It is essential to understand the electrical property and structure of the medium that is to be scanned by the radar as these parameters greatly affect the microwave backscatter return signals. Measurement of the sea ice provides vital information to aid in the development and verification of the theoretical models. Furthermore, to better understand how the overlying snow layer influences microwaves, the overlying snow layer characteristics are also included in the measurements. Other parameters that are to be measured during the field trip are the air and ocean temperature as well as the ocean salinity. Fieldwork team performed ground measurements and took samples from areas surrounding Ross Island, Antarctica, including the front of Scott Base, McMurdo runway (United States), Willy's Field, Turtle Rock, Cape Evans and Cape Royds. Several locations were selected and the coordinate positions of the locations were acquired using the GPS system. In the ground measurements, 7 main parameters were identified and measured in the fieldwork. The 7 parameters are: Sea ice and snow cover thickness, Air, sea ice, snow and ocean temperature, Sea ice and snow density, Sea ice brine volume, crystal size and Orientation, sea ice, snow and ocean salinity, Sea ice and snow surface roughness and finally the site location coordinates. This field measurement results would later be used in the theoretical modelling of the snow and sea ice medium. The microwave Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image at C-Band with HH polarization on the 27th of Oct 2005 had been requested from the Canadian Radarsat satellite.

    Links: Temporal Extent: Spatial Extent:
    Minimum Bounding Rectangle: -78.3667 167.5 -78.3667 167.5

    SCIOPS Short Name: mmu01 Version ID: Not provided Unique ID: C1214621883-SCIOPS

  • Multisensor Analyzed Sea Ice Extent - Northern Hemisphere (MASIE-NH), Version 1

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C1386246275-NSIDCV0.xml
    Description:

    The <a href="/data/masie/index.html">Multisensor Analyzed Sea Ice Extent - Northern Hemisphere (MASIE-NH)</a> products provide measurements of daily sea ice extent and sea ice edge boundary for the Northern Hemisphere and 16 Arctic regions in a polar stereographic projection at both 1 km and 4 km grid cell sizes. MASIE products include an ASCII text file of sea ice extent values in square km for each Arctic region, time series plots, and image files that visually show where the sea ice is. Note: MASIE may look like several other sea ice products distributed at NSIDC and elsewhere, but its source data and intended uses are different. If intended and appropriate uses of the data are not clear after reading the documentation, please contact <a href="mailto:nsidc@nsidc.org">NSIDC User Services</a>.

    Links: Temporal Extent: Spatial Extent:
    Minimum Bounding Rectangle: 0 -180 90 180

    NSIDCV0 Short Name: G02186 Version ID: 1 Unique ID: C1386246275-NSIDCV0

  • Polar Stereographic Valid Ice Masks Derived from National Ice Center Monthly Sea Ice Climatologies, Version 1

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C1386250731-NSIDCV0.xml
    Description:

    These valid ice masks provide a way to remove spurious ice caused by residual weather effects and land spillover in passive microwave data. They are derived from the National Ice Center Arctic Sea Ice Charts and Climatologies data set and show where ice could possibly exist based on where it has existed in the past. There are 12 valid ice masks, one for each month, in netCDF-CF 1.6 compliant files with all associated metadata. The data are on a 304 x 448 grid and are available via FTP.

    Links: Temporal Extent: Spatial Extent:
    Minimum Bounding Rectangle: 39.5 -180 90 180

    NSIDCV0 Short Name: NSIDC-0622 Version ID: 1 Unique ID: C1386250731-NSIDCV0

  • Radarsat-2 Scenes, Natural Resources Canada

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C1214599108-SCIOPS.xml
    Description:

    The collection represents browse images and metadata for systematically georeferenced Radarsat-2 Synthetic Aperture Radar(SAR) satellite scenes. The browse scenes are not geometrically enhanced using ground control points, but are systematically corrected using sensor parameters. Full resolution precision geocoded scenes(corrected using ground control points) which correspond to the browse images can be ordered from MacDonald Dettwiler and Associates Ltd., Vancouver, Canada. Metadata discovery is achieved using the online catalog http://neodf.nrcan.gc.ca OR by using the CWIC OGC CSW service URL : http://cwic.csiss.gmu.edu/cwicv1/discovery. The imaging frequency is C Band SAR : 5405.0000 MHz. RADARSAT-2 is in a polar, sun-synchronous orbit with a period of approximately 101 minutes. The RADARSAT-2 orbit will be maintained at +\/- 1 km in across track direction. This orbit maintenance is suitable for InSAR data collection. The geo-location accuracy of RADARSAT-2 products varies with product type. It is currently estimated at +\/- 30 m for Standard beam products. The revisit period for RADARSAT-2 depends on the beam mode, incidence angle and geographic location of the area of interest. In general, revisit is more frequent at the poles than the equator and the wider swath modes have higher revisit than t he narrow swath modes.

    Links: Temporal Extent: Spatial Extent:
    Minimum Bounding Rectangle: -90 -180 90 180

    SCIOPS Short Name: CWIC_REG Version ID: 1.0 Unique ID: C1214599108-SCIOPS

  • Remote Sensing of Near-Coastal Antarctic Sea Ice and Its Impacts on Ice Shelves and Ecosystems.

    https://cmr.earthdata.nasa.gov/search/concepts/C1214306555-AU_AADC.xml
    Description:

    Metadata record for data from AAS (ASAC) Project 3024. Public The proposed research will derive improved estimates of East Antarctic fast-ice extent and thickness, and their variability, from satellite data. These will be used to explicitly test relationships between fast ice/other environmental parameters and Emperor penguin population dynamics. We shall also combine observations with a wave-ice shelf-sea ice interaction model to test the hypothesis that catastrophic ice shelf break-up events on the E. Antarctic Peninsula are linked to increased ocean wave energy associated with sea-ice extent anomalies (driven by atmospheric anomalies), and/or long-period swell from far-remote storms. This work will aid comprehension of processes responsible for recent rapid ice-shelf demise. Project objectives: 1. To measure and monitor East Antarctic fast ice areal extent and thickness, and their spatio-temporal variability, using satellite remote sensing. 2) To analyse the impact of fast ice variability on the breeding success of Emperor penguins (Aptenodytes forsteri). 3) To investigate the potential impact of sea ice on recent ice shelf break-up breakup on the Antarctic Peninsula. Taken from the 2008-2009 Progress Report: This project has shown a strong correlation between interannual fast ice variability and Emperor penguin breeding success at Dumont d'Urville, and has produced satellite-based maps of East Antarctic fast ice (radar snapshot mosaics from November 1997/98 and 20-day composite images for 2005-2008, extending back to 2000). Secondly, significant progress was made towards implicating an atmospherically-driven anomalous lack of sea ice in recent Antarctic ice-shelf disintegrations. Finally, new research highlights a previously-overlooked mechanical coupling between the floating Mertz Glacier tongue and very thick (greater than 25m) and old (greater than 20yrs) fast ice attached to it, with important implications for ice-sheet margin stability. Taken from the 2009-2010 Progress Report: Progress against objectives: 1) To measure and monitor East Antarctic fast ice areal extent and thickness, and their spatio-temporal variability, using satellite remote sensing. Considerable progress has been made against this objective, building on last year's publication of the first detailed "snapshot" maps of landfast sea ice (fast ice) extent around the East Antarctic coast from 75 degrees E-170 degrees E for the Novembers of 1997 and 1999 using RADARSAT satellite ScanSAR images (see Giles et al., 2008). The main achievements are: * The development of an improved semi-automated method to successfully derive fast ice extent (and pack ice motion) from time series of Envisat Advanced SAR images (Giles et al., in prep.), via a project with the European Space Agency and the International Space Science Institute (Berne, Switzerland). Fast ice is identified as regions of zero motion in the cross-correlation analysis of carefully co-registered pairs of satellite SAR images. * Significant progress in the PhD project (Alex Fraser) aimed at deriving longer and near-continuous time series of fast ice extent from time series of NASA MODIS visible and thermal IR imagery at 1 km resolution. A major challenge has been to address the problem of effectively 'removing' persistent cloud cover from the images. This has been achieved by compositing many thousands of MODIS images to create 20-day composite images of the entire East Antarctic coastal zone from 10W to 170E. This technique was showcased at the prestigious International Geoscience and Remote Sensing 2009 conference in South Africa in July 2009 (Fraser et al., 2009a), with subsequent publication by Fraser et al. (2009b). During the year, this work resulted in an important new time series of fast ice extent that runs from 2000 to 2008 inclusive (Fraser et al., in prep.), with techniques being described in Fraser et al. (in press). This unique dataset represents by far the most detailed estimate of East Antarctic fast ice and its spatio-temporal variability to date. It furthermore represents an important new baseline against which to gauge change, given that Antarctic fast ice is a key yet poorly understood component of the global cryosphere (and ocean freshwater budget), is of immense ecological significance (see 2 below), and is a sensitive indicator of climate change/variability. This baseline is directly comparable to the more familiar overall sea ice (pack ice) extent product. Work is underway to determine why large regional differences occur in fast ice distribution and behaviour, including analysis of the role of bathymetry, grounded icebergs and changes in wind patterns. This work also provides crucial regional-scale fast ice information in support of detailed localised fast ice measurements carried out within the Antarctic Fast Ice network at Casey and Davis (AAS 3032). * A collaborative project has been established with Drs Fricker (USA) and Legresy (France) to estimate the thickness of a large region of perennial fast ice adjacent and attached to the Mertz Glacier Tongue. This has been achieved by combining satellite imagery with surface elevation data from the NASA's ICESat laser altimeter satellite, although current unknowns include the thickness and density of the overlying snowcover. The results suggest that this fast ice is extraordinarily thick i.e. greater than 25 m, and may be at least 20 years old (Massom et al., subm., a). Work examining the glaciological significance of this extremely thick fast ice is described in 3 (below). Work is also underway to evaluate the impact on this and regional fast ice of the major calving of the Mertz Glacier in February 2010. 2) To analyse the impact of fast ice variability on the breeding success of Emperor penguins The first element of this multi-disciplinary, international study was completed last year i.e. a case study showing strong links between Emperor penguin breeding success at Dumont d'Urville and fast ice distribution along the Adelie Land coast of East Antarctica and its variability due to variability in the regional wind field. Results were published in Marine Ecology Progress Series (Massom et al., 2009a), and were also presented in a keynote address to the Xth SCAR International Biology Symposium in September 2009. Work is underway to extend this study both temporally and to other species and regions, using the new MODIS-derived time series of 20-day composite maps of fast ice extent (see 1 above). This work will include a comparison of the fast ice information with new data from French penguin scientists (Drs Barbraud, Ancel and LeMayo) on Emperor penguin mortality and other demographic parameters, with a view to discovering links between the penguin demographics and fast ice variability due to changing weather patterns. Further work is in its initial stages to study the impact of fast ice variability on i) Weddell seal foraging behaviour (with Dr Hindell's group at the Univ. of Tasmania), ii) Adelie penguin breeding success and foraging behaviour (with Drs Southwell and Emmerson, AAD), and iii) other Emperor penguin colonies in East Antarctica (with Dr Wienecke, AAD). Ongoing/future work will also evaluate the impact of abrupt change on the seals and penguins at Dumont d'Urville following the Mertz Glacier calving in February 2010.

    Links: Temporal Extent: Spatial Extent:
    Minimum Bounding Rectangle: -70 -180 -63 180

    AU_AADC Short Name: ASAC_3024 Version ID: 1 Unique ID: C1214306555-AU_AADC